60-Plus Holy Family Extracurricular Activities

We’ve all been there. We invest in all kinds of activities for our kids to pursue. It’s part of the growing process: developing the whole person, not just academically, but physically, socially and emotionally.

Then, as high school nears, that little voice sounds the alarm in the back of a parent’s head. Is my daughter or son good enough to make the team? Can they continue with music? Get a part in the play? Compete with other students? Is high school the end of the line?

“It’s interesting comparing Holy Family to other large schools in the area,” says Activities Director Nick Tibesar. “We have kids staying with programs longer than what I saw in public schools. So often, in other schools, kids come in playing ball with friends during their summers and evenings, sometimes for years, and all of a sudden they end up as a high school freshman and sophomore not on a team anymore.”

Not at Holy Family Catholic High School. Here, students get an opportunity to participate in sports and many other activities they are most passionate about. Plus, they often discover a wide variety of other sports, academic teams, clubs and activities they never considered.

“We encourage kids to try new things and stretch limits,” Nick says. “We want them to be involved in multiple things to fight some of the outside pressure to specialize in just one of them.”

Smaller School Size, Big Opportunities

With a student body of 523 kids, Holy Family provides unlimited opportunities to explore new things. Students often participate in more than one activity, not just during the school year, but also during a single season.

“When looking at sports, there are students who were on the trap and lacrosse teams, or tennis, track, and baseball,” Nick says. “But more common is a kid who participates in both a sport and one of our academic competitions.

“We had a player on our basketball team who also was on our varsity Math League team. As a coach, I recall a half dozen times he had to go to Math League. No one acted like that was strange or gave him a hard time. We said, ‘How did Math League go? And cool you’re doing so well.’

“It’s fun to be in a culture where someone is not ostracized for picking academics over athletics.”

Endless Opportunities

With over 60 extracurriculars to choose from, your Holy Family student is destined to pursue his or her talents, while trying new activities outside of the classroom.

“There are a lot of people who chose Holy Family for the right reasons—faith-based environment, college prep, joining a community where their student is known and cared for,” Nick adds. “All of those things extend to our classroom, lunchroom and after-school activities.

“We consider extracurricular activities the last class of the day. And, they provide the same values as everything else at Holy Family.”

QUICK FACTS:

95% of Holy Family students participate in extracurricular activities

92% of Holy Family students participate in multiple extracurricular activities in a school year

60+ Holy Family extracurricular activities are offered each school year

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Big Turnout for the New Business & Marketing Club

Shark sighting! At Holy Family Catholic High School? Business sharks, that is. Nearly 30 students met at Holy Family on October 5 to kick off the newest extracurricular academic activity­ —the Holy Family Business & Marketing Club.

The big turnout shows strong interest from its leaders, parents and students in expanding Holy Family’s business offerings. And it dovetails seamlessly with the Holy Family Catholic High School goal of providing academic and extracurricular activities that allow students to gain real-life experiences.

“Many of you said you want to figure out if business is what you want to do in college and for a career,” Robb Richter said to a packed room of seniors who attended the kickoff meeting. “If you eventually decide business is what you want to pursue, you’ll learn enough here alone that should help you get that internship as a freshman.”

Richter, a Holy Family parent and, more importantly, an accomplished business leader in corporate acquisitions, is taking a no-nonsense approach when sharing his knowledge with this group of highly engaged students. Here are just a few thoughts he offered at the first meeting:

  • “I have been inside companies so deep that things scare me. You’re going to learn why we didn’t buy those companies.”
  • “If asking for money, wear a tie or break out your best.”
  • “So many companies have debt. It’s become a way of doing business. If you can avoid it, don’t do it.”
  • And when it comes to a company’s vision, “If you don’t outline what your organization wants to be or how it wants the world to see it, you won’t get past the first meeting.”

How much more real-life can you get?

Richter’s plan for the Business & Marketing Club goes deeper than sharing personal experiences. It’s a hands-on approach that gives the students full exposure to broad business topics to help them get a sense of which business tracks interest them most.

Twenty-eight sessions are scheduled throughout the school year, all conducted in the evenings, with students attending on their own time. The first nine meetings are already planned, and students will weigh in on where the program goes from there. Topics to be covered include:

  • Creating a corporate vision and mission
  • Understanding EBITA, COGS, GM and IRR
  • Creating effective business presentations
  • Understanding corporate financial statements
  • Outlining the nuts and bolts of marketing and advertising
  • Building resumes and talented teams

Also planned are field trips to Twin Cities businesses and visits from corporate leaders who will share their real-world knowledge.

The club’s sequence culminates with the students pitching their own business ideas to “shark investors” in a real boardroom. By that time, they’ll be prepared to answer the tough questions, while putting their business savvy and creativity to the test.

“I hope you get something out of this that is different from what you get every day in school,” Richter said to the students attending the kickoff.

The Holy Family Business & Marketing Club is open to current seniors at Holy Family High School, with the pilot year helping establish a broader plan for Holy Family’s curricular business offerings.

“While I was a member of the strategic planning committee, the idea of some type of business program surfaced multiple times and the demand for it was also voiced in surveys and focus groups,” Richter shares. “These seniors will help formulate the next iteration of what business and marketing education becomes for future Holy Family students.”

And that, by definition, is entrepreneurial!

Check out more activities at Holy Family